STEAMPUNK MEETS SHAKESPEARE

The culture and style movement of steampunk will merge with William Shakespeare next year at the Hult Center for the Performing Arts in Eugene, Oregon. The well-known artist Joseph Mross is going to adapt the comic play The Taming of the Shrew written by William Shakespeare and remake it into a performance of the ballet. The Eugene Ballet will create a new adaptation of the famous piece that pays tribute to the style of steampunk. One can already assume that it will not be an ordinary production as you can hardly find two more different concepts as Shakespeare and steampunk.

Steampunk Meets Shakespeare
Steampunk Meets Shakespeare

The decisive factor for the unusual combination was the desire to give the ballet a new and unusual twist. The idea was developed by the artistic director Toni Pimble. He discovered the music of Louise Farrenc who was a composer back in the 19th century. Because of her gender, she did not receive the recognition that Pimple believes she should have now. Pimble describes it as authoritative, strong, and powerfully similar to the best-known pieces of Johannes Brahms or Ludwig van Beethoven. While listening to that music, Pimble understood that the classical dresses would not be strong enough to underline the true power of music made by Farrenc. And this is how the idea of involving the steampunk style into the ballet occurred.

From Burning Man to Shakespeare

The artistic director subsequently contacted the local artist Joseph Mross. The metalsmith has a passion for steampunk, and he is known for his metal artworks exposed at the annual festival Burning Man. Mross was enthusiastic about the idea of merging ballet and steampunk, so he built some models and miniatures. He sees this project as the perfect opportunity to combine different media and styles to create an ideal new world of art. The artist will create three different sets for this performance. One of them should be a large organ wagon. The music lessons for Bianca will take place there. The second piece might be a giant boiler furnace for crazy scientists, and the third one will be a flying tricycle. That will also have flapping wings. The audience can expect a spectacular and new reinterpretation of Shakespeare’s famous play.

A Festival for Women

The performance will be held in the Hult Center’s Silva Concert Hall from April 10 to 11, 2021. The Orchestra Next will play the music of Louise Farrenc, and this is going to be a tribute to the recognition she has not received back in her time. After all, the artistic director Toni Pimble suspects that William Shakespeare could have been a woman. The identity of the genius behind the pseudonym is still not completely clarified. The author could put himself genuinely into the thoughts of women and formulate them as if he or she was writing from the personal experience. This hypothesis will also be a part of the ballet. Pimble wants to give Katherine a loud voice in The Unruly Teething so critics of the play take the wind out of the sails.

A Festival for Women
A Festival for Women